This week our first tomatoes appeared on our cherry tomato plants and our mysterious heirloom tomato plant–though we see some signs of bottom end rot. Also, Arlen updates on his onion experiment and our jalapeno pepper plan is flowering like crazy. This isour second year attempting to grow fruits, vegetables and herbs in containers on our patio in the city. Each week we update with what’s new, good or bad, in our patio garden. This year we are growing: Basil Cherry Tomatoes Cilantro Dill Green Onions Eggplants Habanero Peppers Jalapeno Peppers Spinach Strawberries and a random heirloom tomato plant given to us as a gift Theme music by DoKashiteru – bit.ly

allpurposeplantfood.com Phil with Watch Us Grow shows how his Natural All Purpose Plant Food helps berries grow healthy and big. Q: How is Watch Us Grow different from other water soluble plant foods such as Miracle-Gro, Peters, etc.? Why do gardeners prefer it over other plant foods? A: In addition to the unique ingredient FOL-ADE™, there are a number of other differences which make Watch Us Grow attractive to gardeners and plant enthusiasts: Watch Us Grow is a liquid, not a granular solid. It is therefore easier to mix, does not separate or settle out in the watering can, and will not harden over time. For commercial users, it will not clog your irrigation system. Watch us Grow maintains its effectiveness for a long time. There is no deterioration from year to year. It will be just as good to use three or four years from now as it is today. The Watch Us Grow pour-out cap eliminates dripping, green fingers, and stains on the kitchen counter. It is easy, fast, and convenient to measure when mixing. Most importantly — Watch Us Grow provides better results. Growing tests conducted by an independent consulting service have proven that when applied at the recommended application rates, Watch Us Grow provides superior plant growth and blooms for most species. Watch Us Grow is non-burning. This is a very important fact for today’s busy gardeners who want maximum results and sometimes over-feed to achieve them. Growing tests prove that Watch us Grow is far and away more safe

This week saw the rise of several flowers on our tomato and jalapeno plants. However we also did catch a cutworm on one of our eggplants… This is our second year attempting to grow fruits, vegetables and herbs in containers on our patio in the city. Each week we update with what’s new, good or bad, in our patio garden. This year we are growing: Basil Cherry Tomatoes Cilantro Dill Green Onions Eggplants Habanero Peppers Jalapeno Peppers Oregano Lettuce Spinach Strawberries and a random heirloom tomato plant given to us as a gift Theme music by DoKashiteru – bit.ly

This week Tiffany films the video on her own. We check out how our carrots are looking and how great our carrots are thriving in the unseasonably warm early fall weather. This isour second year attempting to grow fruits, vegetables and herbs in containers on our patio in the city. Each week we update with what’s new, good or bad, in our patio garden. This year we are growing: Basil Cherry Tomatoes Cilantro Dill Green Onions Eggplants Habanero Peppers Jalapeno Peppers Oregano Lettuce Spinach Strawberries and a random heirloom tomato plant given to us as a gift Theme music by DoKashiteru – bit.ly

Now that fall weather is finally here, we’re getting in one of our last harvests of tomatoes and peppers. We also check in on our carrots and say goodbye to our eggplants. This isour second year attempting to grow fruits, vegetables and herbs in containers on our patio in the city. Each week we update with what’s new, good or bad, in our patio garden. This year we are growing: Basil Cherry Tomatoes Cilantro Dill Green Onions Eggplants Habanero Peppers Jalapeno Peppers Oregano Lettuce Spinach Strawberries and a random heirloom tomato plant given to us as a gift Theme music by DoKashiteru – bit.ly

www.pottyinnovations.co.uk The Clover Stackable Planter is an innovative way to bring height to your gardening. They are great for strawberries, suitable for most common herbs and make magnificent 360 degree floral displays. Their lightweight and space saving design makes them ideal for balconies, patios and decking.

This week we update on our carrots, which were mostly eaten by birds previously and are now protected by our DIY carrot cages. This is our second year attempting to grow fruits, vegetables and herbs in containers on our patio in the city. Each week we update with what’s new, good or bad, in our patio garden. This year we are growing: Basil Cherry Tomatoes Cilantro Dill Green Onions Eggplants Habanero Peppers Jalapeno Peppers Oregano Lettuce Spinach Strawberries and a random heirloom tomato plant given to us as a gift Theme music by DoKashiteru – bit.ly

Oh my, so much to talk about – this is one episode you don’t want to miss watching. Important info just for you.

University of Minnesota extension professor Karl Foord explains how anyone can get their own herbs and vegetables by using the container gardening method, so whether you live in a large city, or just don’t want to have to till a garden, you can enjoy the fruits and veggies of your labor. This video is part of the Expert Perspectives series at the University of Minnesota.

Just a quick video to show how easy it is to make next years Strawberry Plants for free from this year’s stock of plants. It’s so easy,all you need to do is to find a healthy plant which has grown some runners or suckers,these are the long stalks with a bit of leaf at the end. Then all you do is anchor the stem down next to the leaf into a pot of soil or compost using a bit of wire. Then after a couple of weeks it should take root naturally and once you see roots coming out of the bottom of the pot you can cut the stalk from the mother plant and you’ll have another free strawberry plant to grow. Dead easy and you’ll never need to buy strawberry plants again.

Check out this cool app and learn guitar – howc.stExpand the description and view the text of the steps for this how-to video. Check out Howcast for other do-it-yourself videos from TreehouseFlicks and more videos in the Vegetable Gardening category. You can contribute too! Create your own DIY guide at www.howcast.com or produce your own Howcast spots with the Howcast Filmmakers Program at www.howcast.com Grow some of your own food by starting a vegetable garden. You’ll eat better and save money. To complete this How-To you will need: A sunny garden spot A wire mesh fence Seeds or seedlings Flowers A soil test A sunny garden spot A wire mesh fence Seeds or seedlings Flowers A soil test Step 1: Decide on a garden type Decide between a raised-bed garden or an in-ground one. Raised beds, which consist of purchased topsoil that sits within a wooden frame, are ideal if your soil is stony or sandy. The main advantage of an in-ground garden is that it needs less watering. Tip: For an in-ground garden, test your soil to find out what nutrients it needs. Garden centers sell do-it-yourself kits, or you can arrange a test through the Cooperative Extension System, a national agricultural network. Find a nearby office on the USDA web site. Step 2: Pick a good spot Pick a spot that gets a lot of sun and isn’t obscured by tree or hedge shade. Step 3: Prep the land Prepare the land by building your raised bed or clearing and tilling a patch of land to a depth of about one foot. A 10 foot

Arlen updates on how his homemade drip irrigation system worked during our weekend away and we check how the garden is doing. This isour second year attempting to grow fruits, vegetables and herbs in containers on our patio in the city. Each week we update with what’s new, good or bad, in our patio garden. This year we are growing: Basil Cherry Tomatoes Cilantro Dill Green Onions Eggplants Habanero Peppers Jalapeno Peppers Oregano Lettuce Spinach Strawberries and a random heirloom tomato plant given to us as a gift Theme music by DoKashiteru – bit.ly

This week we caged our growing cherry tomatoes and check out how the strawberries are doing. This is our second year attempting to grow fruits, vegetables and herbs in containers on our patio in the city. Each week we update with what’s new, good or bad, in our patio garden. This year we are growing: Basil Cherry Tomatoes Cilantro Dill Green Onions Eggplants Habanero Peppers Jalapeno Peppers Oregano Lettuce Spinach Strawberries and a random heirloom tomato plant given to us as a gift Theme music by DoKashiteru – bit.ly

Scotts Associate Eddie shows you how easy it is to grow strawberries in containers

For more information www.sengadesigns.com Home of the Gardening Gourmets – watch our TV pilot called the Garden Gourmets (www.youtube.com and tell us what you think! Strawberries and summer go hand in hand. They are one of the first edible fruits to start off the season. Plus they are so easy to grow and are versatile. And unlike many edibles they can come back year after year and mulitply over time. I like to use them for more than just eating, they make great fillers in your pots and the garden. Watch my vlog to see simple tips on when, where and how to plant this delicious sweet treat.

First garden update: strawberry patch, 21×17.5 feet, planning to build a walk-in cover for it for bird netting. Last year’s patch produced about 20 pounds of strawberries, and a thousand strawberry plants, and the resulting new patch could yield 100 pounds next year, and several thousand runners! This year it felt like I was holding back on eating the strawberries, and they are sooooo gooooood!, so it will be interesting to see what happens with several times the strawberries! TIP: if you want a thousand strawberry runners, don’t clip them, set them when you see them, and leave them attached to the mother plants, also, don’t accidentally uproot them by the runners. Catnip plants will protect strawberry plants and their runners through the summer heat and the winter cold. Unfortunately, catnip will also tend to take over the strawberry patch, unless you have an army of cats to keep them in check. If you have no strawberry plants, growing strawberries from seed works, just collect the extra pieces you get from trimming and culling the fruits, mix them with the top inch of soil in a planter or in the garden. Collect the pieces with a paper towel, and soak off the seeds in a bucket of water, and pour into plant potters. It is possible to get different varieties doing this, if you have a hybrid. (I only did this with strawberries grown in my garden, but it may work with store strawberries) It will take a year for the plants to develop, and even the young plants can survive out

DIY ~ Using empty plastic buckets, you can make your own “upside down” hanging planters and grow vegetables just like in a Topsy Turvy hanging planter. In this video we show you step-by-step how to make your own and the results we had with them. ENJOY!

How to plant bare root and potted strawberries

To find out more visit my website: www.sengadesigns.com It is July and I am still gathering up hand fulls of strawberries. I use an everbearing or day neutral variety called Tristar that produces delicious fruits well into August. I put them everywhere in my garden – using them as ornamentals (that you can eat) in my perennial garden to pots, hanging planters, on my traditional green roof as well as my edible green roof. Check out my vlog to see for yourself!

This video is provided by Armstrong Garden Centers. Check out our website at www.ArmstrongGarden.com Checkout our Facebook at http

Patti Moreno, the Garden Girl, shows you how to plant delicious strawberries. Check out Patti’s website, www.gardengirltv.com

10 Strawberry Albion plants with a StackNGrow planter.

www.GardenToGrow.com Our company offers a complete planting system to suit everyone. Whether you are a seasoned gardener or a novice, you will find it easy and rewarding to create an amazing garden. Create the perfect garden whether you have a lot or very little outdoor space. We can help you make the most of your gardening experience. Bradenton, Florida – Tampa, FL Produced by Visible.net

See how a few simple tricks can make a strawberry pot container a multi-level garden for herbs or flowers.

Transplant strawberry plants in the fall or spring when the plant has stopped producing berries. Keep the root and a stem of the strawberry plant intact in order to keep it alive withtips from a sustainable gardener in this free video on plant care. Expert: Yolanda Vanveen Contact: www.vanveenbulbs.com Bio: Yolanda Vanveen is sustainable gardener who lives in Kalama, Wash. Filmmaker: Daron Stetner

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